Since 2007, under the leadership of Dr Montero-Odasso, the Gait and Brain Seminars were initiated at the Division of Geriatric Medicine, the University of Western Ontario. The main objective of these series is to highlight the entangled relationship between gait and cognition in older adults and to emphasize the importance of gait disturbances as an early predictor of disability, frailty and dementia. These seminars are of interest to geriatricians, neurologists, psychiatrists, physiotherapists and healthcare providers in the field of gerontology.


Most Recent:

Part 11 of the Gait and Brain Seminar Series at Western with international guest speaker Dr. Ervin Sejdic, PhD from The University of Pittsburgh’s Electrical and Computer Engineering, Bioengineering, and Biomedical Informatics Departments. Watch the webinar here! (Begins at time point 46:25)

Date: Tuesday October 17th, 2017

Time: 2:45-4:15 p.m.

Location: Parkwood Institute, Mental Health Building Room # F2-235

Topic: Engineering Human Gait.

View event poster for more details.

Dr. Manuel Montero-Odasso, Dr. Ervin Sejdic, and Dr. Paul Cooper at the 2017 Gait and Brain Lecture “Engineering Human Gait”.


Past Seminars:

Part 10 of the Gait and Brain Seminar Series at Western with international guest speaker Dr. Joe Verghese from the Albert Einstein college of Medicine in Bronx, New York was held October, 2016. This seminar is available online here.

Date: Tuesday October 18th, 2016

Time: 2:30 pm – 4:30 p.m.

Location: Parkwood Institute, Mental Health Building Room # F2-235

Topic:  Gait and Cognition. Lessons we learned 10 years later.

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As part 9 of the Gait and Brain Seminar Series at Western we had the pleasure of hosting international guest speaker Dr. Nicholaas I.  Bohnen from the University of Michigan.

Date: Tuesday October 6, 2015

Time: 2:30 pm – 4:30 p.m.

Location: Mental Health Building Auditorium Parkwood Institute Room # F2-235

Topic:  Role of Cholinergic Therapy to Improve Mobility and Reduce Falls in Parkinson’s disease: Implications for Older Adults


You can view past seminars on our YouTube channel.